The Top 10 Insights from The Science of a Meaningful Life

The Top 10 Insights from The Science of a Meaningful Life

Great article here talking about what the latest research has found regarding, not just being happy, but leading a meaningful life. So much great information here. Grab a cup of coffee and enjoy the insights…


7 Things Happy Employees Do Differently

Finding a lot of interesting and relevant sites and resources on happiness, flourishing and everything promoting optimal living. Thought I’d try out a new feature I have not used; to share an article on my blog– directly from the article’s page. Hope this works.

Businesses are starting to look at the “happiness” and flourishing factors at work, to help build healthy teams and get the most out of their human resources… pretty smart. Here’s an article that talks directly to that. This is a good read not only for business owners and managers, but also for parents and teachers. After all, those children are pretty much like our employees (in a very twisted way)! Enjoy the read by Paula Davis-Laack, JD and MAPP graduate:

7 Things Happy Employees Do Differently.

 

 


Changes among us….

“You can’t stop the future
You can’t rewind the past
The only way to learn the secret
…is to press play.” 
― Jay AsherThirteen Reasons Why

 

It’s that time of year, when kids go back to school, fall sports and activities resume, and nature is readying herself for some change. It’s the start of a new academic year and for some a new fiscal year as well. It’s a time to try new things; changing it up a bit to spice up your life. And what better time than the present to make some changes for the better and for the experience. For me that means; investing in myself so that I may give back to the world… and focus on my passion, positive psychology.

I’ve begun an Accredited Coach Training Program (with MentorCoach), and have signed up to start teaching all those wonderful things that Positive Psychology has to offer to enhance our lives, through a program called, “The Happiness Journey,” created by a company called Hapacus– who focuses on the science of happiness.  As my kids venture back to school to grow their minds, I”m back at the next chapter starting line, ready to begin a new race– reemerging with a new self.  I will also be changing this blog to reflect the new perspective I have on life, and offer my services to those in need.

My target audience looks a lot like me: a beautifully wonderful mid-life woman who wishes to make an intentional change in her life; be it start an exercise program, a happiness program, a self-care program or a program that allows her to discover her calling in life. I’m very excited to start this process and, although it sounds so cliche, “be the change I want to see in the world.”  Gonna work on helping ladies like me increase their positivity ratio quotients (with activities based on scientific findings),  be grateful for what they already have in their lives, and take care of themselves in the process… using extreme self-care techniques.  

Stay tuned as I reinvent BeingMerry and actually define that term. In the mean time, if you’d like to drop me a line, please do. My new email address is:  merry@beingmerry.com  (but of course).


What a Little Savoring Won’t Cure

Wow! Could it be? A whole year and some has passed since my last entry into the bloggosphere, and so much has happened I cannot believe I did not write about it. But that’s okay. I’ll forgive myself  and get on to reflecting and sharing now.

My last entry involved slowing down, smelling the roses and being grateful. Previously, I also wrote about Random Acts of Kindness and Self-compassion. What I was beginning to realize at that time was that my interest in psychology was resurrected, and a new focus on positive aspects was blooming. Now I’ve come to understand this field as Positive Psychology, and I have begun to immerse myself in it 110%

A New Perspective from which to Write

I’m committing to make this field and new perspective a central part of my life; going back to school and training as a Life Coach, with an emphasis on applying positive psychology findings to help people flourish.  I found positive psychology on my own, and the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA), which lead me to the 3rd World Congress on Positive Psychology this past June (2013). From that experience, I found Mentor Coach.com, and Master Classes and lectures with the big hitters in the field, and I am very grateful to be able to learn and grow from all these resources around me.  And I am preparing to give back… sharing some neat concepts that are scientifically based to increase well-being, positive emotion and life satisfaction.  All this through this blog, and through Happiness and Well-being Workshops that I hope to facilitate in the near future.

One concept I would like to focus on today is the power of savoring. The Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley defines savoring as “the concept that being mindfully engaged and aware of your feelings during positive events can increase happiness in the short and long run.” However, further elaborated on by various scholars at the IPPA conference we find three types of savoring: retrospective (past events), concurrent (present events) and prospective (future events). Add one more variable to the concept, relational savoring (done with another person to enhance your present relationship) and you’ve got a recipe for increasing positive emotion in your life, aka, happiness, which affects your well-being on many levels (prolongs your life, reduces illness and stress and a whole lotta other benefits) all from the concept of savoring.

Examples of Savoring

I’ve built a savoring album on Facebook. It holds many memories– many that involve nature and loved ones– that I wish to savor– and savor with others. When I savor retrospectively, I think back on that time in that moment… trying to remember how the atmosphere felt; what my senses remember hearing, seeing, smelling, touching. If there was a loved on involved, I try to remember the interactions of the time and really dig deep to try to remember how I felt.  The picture below is from my savoring album. I took it on a walk I went on a couple of weeks ago. The morning was fresh, the grass smelled like it had just been groomed. The sky was beginning to show it’s face, having woken up from a restful night’s slumber. The hills in the distant were crisp, and I was thankful for these conditions. And I was also grateful that my knee (which does not have an ACL) was working, as were my other body systems, and I was happy. I felt blessed then, as I do right now, reliving it. Sooooo thankful for the weather here in San Diego… and being able to live here to experience it.

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Currently, I sit here at my desk typing this post, with double french doors open to our courtyard that holds nature in place– plants such as giant birds of paradise, palm trees and other plants. I feel a slight breeze blow through the door opening and see the greenery reachable by a small walk. I close my eyes and hear the sound of birds chirping.  I look and see giant leaves swaying just a bit by the breeze.  What I smell is freshness– in the air and to the start to the day. I feel blessed to have this moment. (so quiet… especially since the kids are sleeping in since it’s the last Friday before school starts!).

Prosepectively, I am savoring a day to spend with my kids…. just to be. Since this is the last friday of Summer, I told them we would “play hookey” and do something fun all day. This is very much out of our norm, since everyday- even in the summer- involves chores and responsibilities. Today, we will take a day off from those things– and just be with each other. I’ve given them some options on how to spend the day. I will wake them  after posting this entry (because it’s 9:45am– that is plenty of time for a 16, 14 and 10 year old to sleep in), and check in to see where today will take us. I know this is our last summer with a 16, 14 and 10 year old. Next summer, they will be 17, 15 and 11. And I also will be a year old. Who knows what will happen in the coming year? Hopefully opportunities for growth… for us all. But for now, we will appreciate the day ahead of us. What a blessing it will be.

Savoring Challenge

One of my favorite books as of lately is “The How of Happiness” by Sonja Lyubomirsky. The author offers a few practical activities that involve savoring, worth checking out. One that I talk about above that is helping me remember and relive special moments is the savoring album. Today, I challenge you to do some savoring of your own. Create an online album, or even better, go through your older albums from years ago– when they weren’t digital. Try to think back to those moments. How was life different then? What didn’t you know, that you know now? What things brought the sparkle to your eye? What things held your interest? Take a moment and relive. Science shows, when you relive a special moment you build positive emotion, which builds resilience, and eventually a longer, happier life… one built on flourishing!


More Kindness on Valentine’s Day

February 14th. What better day to celebrate love and kindness in the world (besides on your own birthday) than on Valentine’s Day? Last night I spent some time writing words of love to my husband and family. Today I presented those words to them, and found it put me on a path of love for the day; on a gentler road. What if we started all our days like that? What if the world started all their days with loving words and compliments? What a changed world we would see– one of pure compassion.  Makes me want to try to start every day this way. It does take time and effort, but it’s well worth it.

Words that Matter

Last night I also helped my 9-year-old daughter with her Valentines. She has moved away from store-bought valentine’s for a few years now, and prefers to make them herself. Last year she made bookmark valentines. This year it was even more simple: a piece of paper cut out like a heart (with butterflies printed on it– as her school’s mascot is the Monarch), a complimentary sentence, and a lollypop attached. She made these by herself, stamping names onto the heart, adding a scrolling glittery decoration as well, and composed each compliment. I loved reading what she thought of her classmates: “You are creative,” You are a good friend,” You are generous,” You are good at math.” On and on and on she went.  How wonderful for these kids to have those words to go back to whenever they need a little lift.  She made me a card, and her father, brother and sister one as well. I love her warm spirit and seeing the good in other people. I just wished she would see more of the good spirit in herself, every day.

Words for Thy Self

Though my youngest has a complimentary spirit toward others, she does not have one towards herself. Unfortunately, she is always comparing herself to others; but only in the areas in which she is lacking. She constantly replays tapes of negativity about herself. Where she’s heard this information from, I’m not sure. But I want to put an end to it. So, this month we’ve started an experiment using daily self-affirmations.  I saw an interview this Fall on Oprah’s Lifeclass , “You Become What You Believe,” with Cheryl Richardson— a life coach, author and expert on self-care.  On Cheryl’s website she states:

    “Self-care is good for the planet.  From years of personal experience, as well as coaching great men and women, I’ve come to understand that selfishness leads to selflessness.  When we care deeply for ourselves, we naturally begin to care for others – our families, our friends, our greater global community, and the environment – in a healthier and more effective way.”

During her interview with Oprah, Cheryl recommended– to improve your self-image– saying positive daily affirmations for 30 days to turn your attitude around from a half-empty to half-full perspective. Her thinking– shared by many– is that we need to retrain our brain to thinking we are what we intend, and then we will act accordingly. Repeating this process (saying an affirmation everyday) allows the brain to strengthen associations, making this an exercise of the brain as well. Self-fulfilling prophecy is in volumes of psychological research, and still exists after all these years, even though we know our mind can trick us into believing anything really. Cheryl recommends breaking away from old habits of self-doubt and into new habits of self-love.  If we can trick our brains into believing the worst about ourselves and then acting to make that belief true, we are then able to trick our brains to believing the best about ourselves, and then acting to make THAT belief true.  What I am talking about here is directly tied into self-compassion and self-kindness that I posted about previously.

Daily Self-Affirmation Resources

Below is a list of resources that I use for daily self-affirmations; little reminders that life is positive and we are up for the challenge. Take a look. Some are print based and others are electronic. The great thing is that they are available to all– and can help lead us in the right direction– the direction of self-love.

  • Cheryl Richardson shares a list of affirmations on Oprah.com.
  • Another source I go to– or one that comes to me in my inbox via email is from Owning Kristina. It’s called “Mojo Mondays” and it’s a way to start your week off thinking about something healthy… for yourself.
  • Louise Hay, a motivational author and founder of Hay House Publications also promotes daily affirmations.
  • I found a nice app recently for the iPhone. An Affirmations app that has numerous positive affirmations for all to practice, all at your finger tips. Worth checking out.
  • Facebook has a Positive Affirmations page as well, with new posts daily.

Which ever source you choose to pull from, the point is– just be kinder to yourself and to do so, you need to believe in yourself fully.

Wishing everyone a lovely Valentine’s day full of kindness in any form!


The Greater Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life

You know the feeling when you’ve just read an excellent book and you have to share it with a friend? Well, that is the way I feel about a website that I just discovered—one that’s existed for a while but I just happened upon it, and I want to share it with the world NOW.

My recent post on gratitude lead me to this treasured site…the Greater Good Science Center . It’s housed on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley, was founded in 2001, and its mission is to:

    “Study the psychology, sociology, and neuroscience of well-being, and teach skills that foster a thriving, resilient, and compassionate society.”

The GGSC accomplishes their mission in a variety of ways that include sponsoring scholarly fellows across disciplines who conduct research conducive to the mission; publishing an online magazine—the Greater Good—to disseminate relevant information related to their mission and connect scientists with parents, educators, community leaders, and even policy makers.

Another vehicle to support their mission is the “Raising Happiness Blog” founded and facilitated by Christine Carter, Ph.D., which focuses on raising happy children as well as happy parents with the Great Good Parents program.  It contains parent advice and practical tips that are science based, as Carter shares research findings along with anecdotes from her own parenting trials. This blog can also be accessed here: http://www.raisinghappiness.com/ (I accessed this link from the GGSC a day ago, but it looks like the link has changed. This raisinghappiness.com link takes you to the bulk of the parenting resources sponsored by the GGSC). 

The GGSC also organizes and hosts events that bring together scientists, educators and the public. The Science of a Meaningful Life seminar series has included talks from experts on a number of topics related to a meaningful life. Such experts include Paul Ekman talking about compassion, to Jon Kabat-Zinn discussing mindfulness, as well as Barbara Fredrickson, and Philip Zimbardo to name other experts.

The Core Beliefs

Taken directly from their website, GGSC core beliefs state:

  • Compassion is a fundamental human trait, with deep psychological and evolutionary roots. By creating environments that foster cooperation and altruism, we help nurture the positive side of human nature.
  • Happiness is not simply dependent on a person’s genes. It is a set of skills that can be taught, and, with practice, developed over time.
  • Happiness and altruism are intertwined—doing good is an essential ingredient to being happy.
  • Science should do more than help us understand human behavior and emotion in the abstract; it should be applied toward improving people’s personal and professional lives.
  • Studying the roots of good, healthy, and positive behavior is just as important as studying human pathologies. To promote individual and social well-being, science must examine how people overcome difficult circumstances and how they develop positive emotions and relationships.
  • Individual well-being promotes social well-being, and social well-being promotes individual well-being. The well-being of society as a whole can best be achieved by providing information, tools, and skills to those people directly responsible for shaping the well-being of others.

Site Features

The site has a number of features that include Articles, Raising Happiness Blog, News and events, Videos/podcasts and other Resources such as links to organizations, books, and presentations from the experts. In the articles section, there are “tools for the greater good” which includes practical tips on how to live a meaningful life. One upcoming event will feature Dr. Kristin Neff (whom I quoted in a previous post) in a seminar talking about Self-compassiona and Emotional Resilience.

In the video/podcast section of this site you’ll find experts speaking on a variety of topics from Stanford’s Fred Zuskin talking about forgiveness to John Gottman talking about healthy relationship, to Jon Kabat-Zinn discussing mindfulness in daily practice and a host of others that the public now has access through due to this site.

See for Yourself

Well, enough of me raving about this site, you need to check it out for yourself.  I’m sure you won’t be disappointed .What I am really enjoying about this site is that it is opening up so many other doors to sharing goodness, good news, and over all good energy in the world! Who wouldn’t enjoy a resource like that? Time to update my links on my own site, and start more researching into mindfulness.  What aspect of life will you savor today?